Originals: Kimberly Bradley on Broken Dreams

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  Born in Southern California’s Mojave desert in the late 60s, writer/editor Kimberly Bradley’s base has moved steadily eastward. After graduating from Middlebury College in 1990, she ventured to Hamburg, Germany, where she inadvertently found herself in a divided country attempting to put itself back together. Now based in Berlin, Bradley writes about art, design, architecture… Read more »

Originals: Siri Hustvedt on the literary ghosts of Mommsenstrasse

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Siri Hustvedt is the author of four novels, The Blindfold, The Enchantment of Lily Dahl, What I Loved, and The Sorrows of an American, as well as two books of essays, A Plea for Eros, and Mysteries of the Rectangle: Essays on Painting.

Historical Berlin: Every Man Dies Alone by Hans Fallada

  This is the first in a series of readings, by the actor Harvey Friedman, of passages taken from novels that explore eras of Berlin past. First published in Germany in 1947 and finally translated into English in 2009, Every Man Dies Alone is a true masterpiece from a bestselling writer who saw his life crumble following his… Read more »

Originals: Joyce Hackett on Grave Shopping

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  Joyce Hackett’s fiction and non-fiction have appeared in publications including Harpers, The Paris Review, London Magazine, Boston Review, Prospect (UK), The Independent, Salon, and the Berlin Daily Der Tagespiegel. Her first novel, Disturbance of the Inner Ear, won the 2003 the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for Fiction by an American Woman. Hackett is currently writing a… Read more »

Originals: Liesl Schillinger on What’s In A Name

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  Liesl Schillinger is a New York-based arts writer and literary critic, and a regular contributor to the New York Times Book Review. She translates from French, German, and Italian when time allows, and currently is at work on a travel memoir. Schillinger is especially well-versed, as both critic and translator, in the world of German literature. Please read… Read more »

Originals: Clare Wigfall On The Neighbors

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  Clare Wigfall’s debut collection of stories The Loudest Sound and Nothing (Faber and Faber) was published in 2007. In 2008, she was awarded the BBC National Short Story Award for the opening story in the collection. Her work has been published in Prospect, A Public Space, New Writing 10, Tatler, and The Dublin Review, and has also… Read more »

Originals: Chloe Aridjis On The Ghost Stations

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  Chloe Aridjis grew up in the Netherlands and in Mexico. She studied literature at Harvard and then wrote her PhD in 19th-century French poetry and magic shows at Oxford. She lived in Berlin for 5 1/2 years and became enamored of its public transportation system. Her first novel, Book of Clouds, is set in Berlin was recently… Read more »

Originals: Brittani Sonnenberg on Graffiti Love

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Brittani Sonnenberg is a freelance journalist and fiction writer living in Berlin. She has written for the Associated Press and Time Magazine, and her fiction has appeared in the O’Henry Short Stories 2008 and in Ploughshares.

Kunstwerk: Emily Hass

Emily Hass’ series, “SIDES Berlin”, is based on the original architectural plans and sections of her father’s childhood home on Altonaer Strasse in Tiergarten where he lived up until 1938, when he and his immediate family escaped Nazi Germany to live in London.  (The building was subsequently bombed in 1943.) This work visually echoes the loss of… Read more »

Cold, Back Then by Mitch Cohen

Around 1980, a “Spiegel” cover showed one of the grimmer portraits of Luther in furs and the headline “New Little Ice Age?” Intricate frost patterns brocaded our windows. Back then, every apartment in Kreuzberg heated with coal. West Berlin’s government stored hundreds of thousands of tons of it in warehouses against the chance of resumed communist… Read more »